The Delta Grassroots Caucus (DGC) is a broad coalition of grassroots leaders in the eight-state Delta region. DGC is also a founding partner of the Economic Equality Caucus,
which advocates for economic equality across the USA.

Update from Louisiana's massive increase in coronavirus infections--from Feeding Louisiana

Posted on March 26, 2020 at 09:47 AM

This is an update from the Louisiana food bank network, Feeding Louisiana, about the dire coronavirus situation in that state. As of March 21, Louisiana had the fastest 13-day growth in confirmed COVID-19 cases in the world.

Feeding America officials in Louisiana and elsewhere tell us that financial donations are the best way to help. If you can contribute any amount, please go to one of the Louisiana food bank sites below and go to the link that says “Donate.” You can donate in about one minute.

LOUISIANA FOOD BANK WEBSITES

Food Bank of Central Louisiana Alexandria, Louisiana (318) 445-2773 www.fbcenla.org

Greater Baton Rouge Food Bank Baton Rouge, Louisiana (225) 359-9940 www.brfoodbank.org

Food Bank of Northeast Louisiana Monroe, Louisiana (318) 322-3567 www.foodbanknela.org

Second Harvest Food Bank of Greater New Orleans and Acadia New Orleans, Louisiana (504) 734-1322 www.no-hunger.org

The spread of the recent novel coronavirus and its associated disease, COVID-19, have created significant disruptions in the global economy. This holds true in Louisiana, as well. As of March 25, 2020, 1,795 total COVID-19 cases have been confirmed across 46 Louisiana parishes, with 65 deaths related to the disease.

Locally, the spread of COVID-19 is among the highest in the nation and world.

As of March 21st, Louisiana had the fastest 13-day growth in confirmed COVID-19 cases in the world;

https://gov.louisiana.gov/assets/docs/covid/govCV19Brief-2.pdf Orleans Parish has the sixth-highest rate of known coronavirus cases of any county in the U.S.; “New Orleans has some of the highest coronavirus infection rates in the U.S. – yet it’s overlooked,” March 23,2020;

https://www.nola.com/news/coronavirus/article_c0509efc-6d4f-11ea-ae50-236ff5752610.html

Significant case counts are found across the state. As of March 25, 2020:

–Orleans Parish, 827 cases, 37 deaths

–Jefferson Parish, 359 cases, 7 deaths

–Caddo Parish, 93 cases, 0 deaths

–East Baton Rouge Parish, 75 cases, 3 deaths

–St. Tammany Parish, 67 cases, 1 death

–Ascension Parish, 65 cases, 1 death

As of March 25th, these six parishes reported more confirmed cases of COVID-19 than 10 U.S. states and territories.

The critical actions undertaken to alleviate the rapid spread of the virus across the state and nation have presented significant challenges to local economies.

–March 13th, the closure of all K-12 schools.

–March 16th, the closure of bars, gyms, casinos, movie theaters, and the restriction of restaurants to takeout and delivery service only. This significantly impacts minimum- and low-wage employees across all parishes of the state. Individuals who did not need food assistance previously are surging demand across the network.

–March 22nd, a statewide Stay at Home order directing the closure of all non-essential businesses and all Louisianans to shelter in place until April 13th.

–March 24th, President Donald Trump approved a Major Disaster Declaration for the state of Louisiana.

The effects of COVID-19 have introduced significant pressures on our social safety net.

Unemployment

The Louisiana Workforce Commission reported on Sunday, March 22 that its unemployment applications count for the week had reached 71,000, compared to 1,698 for the previous week, representing a nearly 4200% increase.

LWC reported on Monday, March 23rd that its projected unemployment benefits payout for the week would fall between $11 million and $17 million, compared to a regular week’s payout of around $2 million.

Reflected in these numbers is the statewide increase in need, including many individuals who are now seeking assistance through the food bank network for the first time.

SNAP

The Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services has seen an overwhelming increase in SNAP applications.

Between March 9th and March 15th, Louisiana DCFS received 5,743 SNAP applications.

Between March 16th and March 24th, DCFS has received 30,181 applications.

DCFS has transitioned the majority of its statewide staff to remote work. While its 900 eligibility workers are focused on processing new applications, DCFS reports a decline in efficiency related to remote work challenges. Additionally, SNAP program rules requiring DCFS staff to conduct phone interviews with each applicant to determine program eligibility represent another barrier to rapid distribution of food assistance benefits to Louisianans in need.

Louisiana’s food banks are responding to an unprecedented level of demand, while mitigating declines in volunteer availability, partner agency operations, and retail food donations. We need all the support we can get- monetary donations are better than food, and volunteers are still needed to assist. Precautions are being taken to maximize safety and social distancing.

Delta's Vulnerability to Health & Economic Crises; and Request to Aid Your Local Food Banks

Posted on March 23, 2020 at 05:47 PM

As we all do our best to deal with the economic, physical and other impacts from the coronavirus, we encourage federal, state, local and private sector entities to take prompt, effective action in responding to the pandemic. In keeping with our efforts to disseminate information about our region, we would like to convey recent reports regarding economically vulnerable populations in two of our states: Arkansas and Mississippi.

We also provide contact information for food banks across the region and encourage our partners to do what they can to help those in need of food during this crisis. Donations on their websites are especially easy, fast and effective ways to help.

We also provide contact information for the USDA National Hunger Hotline for information about obtaining food. This is maintained by the national anti-hunger and poverty organization Hunger Free America (www.hungerfreeamerica.org)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. “ALICE” Report on Arkansans either below the poverty level or with limited income and assets’

II. Rethink Mississippi article on Mississippi’s vulnerability to economic downturns and health care crises

III. Short list of suggestions for partners to urge action on the part of federal, state and local powers that be- more affordable care for the elderly, housing and employee benefits, more affordable child care, a state earned income tax credit, greater funding for SNAP, school meals, WIC during this crisis

IV. Support your local food banks—list of contact information for food banks in the 8-state Greater Delta Region. A financial donation is one of the fastest and most efficient ways to help in this crisis.

USDA NATIONAL HUNGER HOTLINE—for GENERAL information about obtaining food—website at: www.hungerfreeamerica.org

For over two years, Hunger Free AmericaTM has been operating the USDA National Hunger Hotline. The hotline is a resource for individuals and families seeking information on how to obtain food. The National Hunger Hotline staff connects callers with emergency food providers in their community, government assistance programs, and various social services.

The hotline can be reached at 1-866-3-HUNGRY or 1-877-8-HAMBRE (for Spanish) from Monday through Friday (7 a.m. to 10 p.m. ET).

I. Many Arkansans who have jobs are still economically vulnerable:

A recent report from the national nonprofit United for ALICE (Asset Limited, Income Constrained, Employed), the Winthrop Rockefeller Foundation, and Entergy Arkansas found that 24% of Arkansas households had enough income to place them above the federal poverty level but not enough to make ends meet or save for the future.

Another 17% of Arkansas families earn less than the federal poverty level. Together with the ALICE category of Asset Limited, Income Constrained Employed people, this means that 41% of the population are threatened with acute financial distress from a natural disaster, unexpected expense or illness.

Mississippi’s slow recovery from the last recession left our country’s poorest state even further behind: An article by Jake McGraw, public policy coordinator for the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation based in Jackson, Mississippi published an article in the Institute’s publication Rethink Misssissippi in which he cited research from Prosperity Now that more than half of Mississippians do not have enough cash savings to cover basic expenses for three months without income. One quarter ot Mississippi households could not get by even if they sold their largest possessions like a house or car.

This article cited figures that Mississippi’s economy has still not fully recovered from the last recession over 10 years ago. The state’s total economic output in 2018 was 1.5% lower than it was in 2008, personal income grew at only 1% a year since 2008, last among all the states and less than half the national growth rate. The unemployment rate of 5.5% was second highest in the country (after Alaska) and rising at the fastest pace in the USA even before the coronavirus pandemic.

NOTE: The Delta Caucus will of course follow the recommendations of the appropriate authorities regarding the May 28-29, 2020 Greater Delta Region Summit in Little Rock. Some authorities estimate that the coronavirus spread may begin to slow by late April, others believe it will get worse for a longer time, but of course we just don’t know. We will follow medical, scientific and other appropriate authorities’ information, consider a meeting with a small number of speakers live-streamed by social media if the pandemic prevents holding the conference as planned, or we may postpone it to a later date. We will continue monitoring the situation.

Any registration fees will be applied to the Delta Summit whenever it is held.

Income and asset constrained working families in Arkansas: Stephanie Hoopes, director of United for ALICE, was quoted in the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette as saying that if people in the ALICE category “would get sick, ALICE doesn’t have any additional money for health care. ALICE usually works at hourly paid jobs, and to not get paid and forgo a week or two weeks’ worth of wages, it could be devastating.” The ALICE report utilized 2017 census data, tax data, housing data and other economic information.

The Arkansas Delta is especially vulnerable. Lee County in the heartland east Arkansas Delta had the largest number of people earning under the ALICE threshold at 64%. About 63% of seniors were below the threshold, and African American and Hispanic households are disproportionately higher in the ALICE category.

Arkansas like Mississippi has faced challenges in fully recovering from the last recession. The percentage of Arkansans struggling to make ends meet increased by 20% from 2007 to 2017. But the cost of living rose over that time, and the federal poverty line does not accurately measure what is needed to maintain a family.

The federal poverty level is $24,600 for a family of four and $12,060 for a single adult. For a family of four, household expenses were $46,812. Sharece West-Scantlebury, CEO of the Rockefeller Foundation, said the federal poverty line “is not sufficient in terms of what it really takes to run a family.” The federal poverty level was established in the 1960s.

II. Contact your Members of Congress and state governments about responses to the crisis:

Solutions in the report included more affordable care for the elderly, housing and employee benefits, more affordable child care, and a state earned income tax credit.

Delta Caucus partners emphasize it is imperative that SNAP, school meals, Women, Infants and Children nutrition programs be continued at full funding for the duration of the pandemic.

Regarding nutrition programs, we would like to quote part of a statement from Joel Berg, CEO of the national anti-hunger and poverty organization Hunger Free America urging that an increase in overall SNAP purchasing power must remain a part of the bill inorder to prevent the existing hunger crises from getting worse and to keep grocery stores, farmers’ markets and corner food stores from closing:

“…In 2018, when the economy was still strong, 37 million Americans — including 11 million children — lived in food insecure households, unable to afford an adequate supply of food. In the last few days, tens of millions of low-income students have lost access to school lunches, breakfasts, and after-school snacks and suppers due to school closures. The heroic efforts of schools to deliver alternative meals are only serving a small portion of kids who regularly eat school meals. Large numbers of older Americans have lost meals due to senior center shutdowns. In addition, millions of Americans who previously worked for modest wages and/or depended on tips to survive have suddenly lost jobs and/or have suffered from dramatic reductions in incomes.

All of this has greatly worsened the country’s pre-existing hunger crisis. This is the first time in modern U.S. history that we have seen a nationwide natural disaster combined with an economic collapse, so we can’t even begin to imagine the long-term devastation for the nation, particularly for the vast number of people struggling to afford food before the crisis.

Congress and the President must enact a massive increase in food aid — now…”

Please keep the severity of this regional and national in mind in communications with the powers that be. We are encouraging Congress to promptly pass a stimulus package that will provide broad-based help to those who most need it.

III. The recession in Mississippi:

Jake McGraw’s article in Rethink Mississippi stated that Mississippi’s lethargic recovery had left the poorest state in the country even further behind. The deficit in Mississippi’s unemployment rate and the national rate more than doubled since 2008, while the gap in personal income increased from $10,400 to $16,600.

Unfortunately, the sectors that make up a disproportionately large percentage of Mississippi’s workforce in leisure, hospitality and retail are among those hit first in this downturn.

Initial unemployment claims rose by 33% last week across the country in the first wave of shocks, and upcoming blows will likely be even worse, according to most economic analysts. We would encourage Congress to come up with a strong stimulus package including the broad-based features mentioned above, but state governments can also take more action. In Mississippi the state government does not provide much of a cushion for people who become unemployed or ill. McGraw points out that state law does not require paid medical or family leave, unemployment insurance is the nation’s lowest at $235 a week and only reaches 14% of unemployed, according to the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.

The federal government pays for most of the safety net programs, the state of Mississippi set most of the eligibility requirements and limites Medicaid, SNAP and TANF aid to only part of the state’s low-income people. The Legislature recently passed a bill giving local governments the choice of paying employees on administrative leave but rejected an amendment to give leave pay to private sector workers. We would ask our Mississippi partners to weigh in on this set of issues and ask federal, state and local officials to be generous and help public and private sector employees survive this crisis.

IV. Contact your local food banks for information on how to get food to those in need, and consider a financial donation of any amount to your local food bank:

Below is a list of contact information for the Feeding America food banks in our 8-state region. They can also get you in touch with a local food pantry if you are not near the city where their headquarters is located.

The websites have links that say “Donate,” and this is the quickest and easiest way to help out in this crisis. It just takes a minute, and for example a $1 contribution will provide 5 healthy meals, a $50 contribution will provide 250 healthy meals. Even small contributions help!

Financial donations are the most useful way to help, but food donatIons are welcomed as well! The best foods are peanut butter, pasta, pasta sauce, canned meat, oatmeal and water. At most food banks, food donors are directed to the warehouse dock to donate because the lobby is closed to the public to adhere to social distancing.

If you call the food bank they can direct you to food pantries for those in need of food. I contributed today and the entire process took less than one minute.

You will need to type in the website listing and go directly to the foodbank—this is not a direct link.

The national Feeding America website is at www.feedingamerica.org

Feeding America Food Banks in the Greater Delta Region:

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Update on Greater Delta Region Summit in Little Rock, May 28-29, 2020

Posted on March 02, 2020 at 11:12 AM

The Greater Delta Region Summit to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the bipartisan White House “Delta Vision, Delta Voices” conference on the Delta in Washington, DC in May, 2000 is set for May 28, 2020 opening session at the Arkansas State Capitol, and main session on May 29, 2020 at the Clinton Library in Little Rock.

We have already been receiving RSVPs and registration fees so please register ASAP as space is limited. Registration information is below.

The key themes for this conference are women’s issues in the Delta and economic opportunity for economically challenged populations. In many cases the two themes are inter-related. Conference Co-Chair is Rupa Dash, CEO of the World Woman Foundation along with Delta Caucus Director Lee Powell.

We will have announcements of funded community and economic development projects by major institutions in the region as examples of the productive work that is going on in the Greater Delta Region.

We will also re-dedicate ourselves to strong advocacy for the Delta’s progress in 2020 and beyond.

This is a unique occasion in the history of the Delta Caucus, so it will be on a first come, first served basis. We are already getting reservations and there is limited space. We will have to cut off reservations when the space runs out.

A requirement for admission will be that we have received the $125 registration fees by May 18, 2020, although again the space may run out much earlier than that at some point in early 2020. No late registrations or registrations at the front desk at the time of the event can be permitted in light of the larger scale of this event and the larger turnout. The area close to the podium at the Arkansas Capitol Rotunda has limited space, and seating is limited at the Clinton Library Great Hall.

SCHEDULE: The opening session is at the Arkansas Capitol Rotunda on the early evening of May 28, 2020 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

(We will have an informal, socializing dinner at the group hotel right after the opening session concludes at 7 p.m. Group hotel will probably be the Doubletree Hotel in the Little Rock River Market District.

MAIN SESSION: May 29, 2020 at the Clinton Library Great Hall from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

We are glad to be working with Rupa Dash and the World Woman Federation in bringing many new partners into our coalition. Equal pay for equal work for women, greater opportunities for women in business, entrepreneurialism, the professions, elected office, the academic world will be among the key issues.

We will be focusing as well on constructive economic policies for economically challenged populations in the Delta, including support for Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs), Earned Income Tax Credit, programs similar to the Clinton administration rural Empowerment Zones for attracting investment to lower income areas, job creation at good wages, SNAP and other nutrition programs, health care, infrastructure improvements, and environmentally sustainable agriculture.

KEY SPEAKERS: It is too early to announce the details of the program. Invited speakers will include President Clinton, Gov. Asa Hutchinson, Members of Congress, and leaders from the 8-state Greater Delta Region from southern Illinois and Missouri to New Orleans and eastward to the Alabama Black Belt.

REGISTRATION: You register by sending in the $125 registration fees.

We offer substantial group discounts on registration fees if you can organize a group of people to attend. This would need to be at least four people to get a discount down to $75, and larger discounts will be given for larger groups.

Space is limited and this will be on a first come, first served basis on who has sent in their registration fees when we run out of space. The Clinton Library Great Hall has limited space, and for the Rotunda there is limited space as far as those who are able to be seated relatively close to the podium.

Space may run out early in 2020. If not, we will close out registrations on May 18, 2020. We will not be able to allow admission for those who have not sent in their registration fees by then. We will not accept late registrations or people who want to pay at the front desk at the time the event is starting.

The best, fastest and easiest way to register is by paying the $125 registration fees by going to the website at mdgc.us and going to the PayPal link at the top of the site that says “Donate.”

The PayPal link accepts all major cards and creates a written record of the transaction. We will be glad to send invoices or receipts where requested.

If you prefer to pay by check, please make out the $125 check to “Delta Caucus” and mail to:

Delta Caucus

5030 Purslane Place

Waldorf, MD 20601

GROUP HOTEL

The group hotel is the Doubletree, down the street from the Clinton Library. To get the discount rate of $99 for the night of May 28, call the hotel at 501-372-4371 or 1-800-222-8733 and say you are with the Delta Caucus group.

EXAMPLES OF PARTICIPANTS THUS FAR:

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Greater Delta Region Summit on 20th Anniversary of White House Conference on the Delta, May 28-29, 2020

Posted on December 18, 2019 at 01:09 PM

The Greater Delta Region Summit to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the bipartisan White House “Delta Vision, Delta Voices” conference on the Delta in Washington, DC in May, 2000 is set for May 28, 2020 opening session at the Arkansas State Capitol, and main session on May 29, 2020 at the Clinton Library in Little Rock.

We have already been receiving RSVPs and registration fees so please register ASAP as space is limited. Registration information is below.

The key themes for this conference are women’s issues in the Delta and economic opportunity for economically challenged populations. In many cases the two themes are inter-related. Conference Co-Chair is Rupa Dash, CEO of the World Woman Federation along with Delta Caucus Director Lee Powell.

We will have announcements of funded community and economic development projects by major institutions in the region as examples of the productive work that is going on in the Greater Delta Region.

We will also re-dedicate ourselves to strong advocacy for the Delta’s progress in 2020 and beyond.

This is a unique occasion in the history of the Delta Caucus, so it will be on a first come, first served basis. We are already getting reservations and there is limited space. We will have to cut off reservations when the space runs out.

A requirement for admission will be that we have received the $125 registration fees by May 18, 2020, although again the space may run out much earlier than that at some point in early 2020. No late registrations or registrations at the front desk at the time of the event can be permitted in light of the larger scale of this event and the larger turnout. The area close to the podium at the Arkansas Capitol Rotunda has limited space, and seating is limited at the Clinton Library Great Hall.

SCHEDULE:

The opening session is at the Arkansas Capitol Rotunda on the early evening of May 28, 2020 from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.

(We will have an informal, socializing dinner at the group hotel right after the opening session concludes at 7 p.m. Group hotel will probably be the Doubletree Hotel in the Little Rock River Market District.

MAIN SESSION: May 29, 2020 at the Clinton Library Great Hall from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.

We are glad to be working with Rupa Dash and the World Woman Federation in bringing many new partners into our coalition. Equal pay for equal work for women, greater opportunities for women in business, entrepreneurialism, the professions, elected office, the academic world will be among the key issues.

We will be focusing as well on constructive economic policies for economically challenged populations in the Delta, including support for Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs), Earned Income Tax Credit, programs similar to the Clinton administration rural Empowerment Zones for attracting investment to lower income areas, job creation at good wages, SNAP and other nutrition programs, health care, infrastructure improvements, and environmentally sustainable agriculture.

KEY SPEAKERS: It is too early to announce the details of the program. Invited speakers will include President Clinton, Gov. Asa Hutchinson, Members of Congress, and leaders from the 8-state Greater Delta Region from southern Illinois and Missouri to New Orleans and eastward to the Alabama Black Belt.

REGISTRATION:

You register by sending in the $125 registration fees.

We offer substantial group discounts on registration fees if you can organize a group of people to attend. This would need to be at least four people to get a discount down to $75, and larger discounts will be given for larger groups.

Space is limited and this will be on a first come, first served basis on who has sent in their registration fees when we run out of space. The Clinton Library Great Hall has limited space, and for the Rotunda there is limited space as far as those who are able to be seated relatively close to the podium.

Space may run out early in 2020. If not, we will close out registrations on May 18, 2020. We will not be able to allow admission for those who have not sent in their registration fees by then. We will not accept late registrations or people who want to pay at the front desk at the time the event is starting.

The best, fastest and easiest way to register is by paying the $125 registration fees by going to the website at mdgc.us and going to the PayPal link at the top of the site that says “Donate.”

The PayPal link accepts all major cards and creates a written record of the transaction. We will be glad to send invoices or receipts where requested.

If you prefer to pay by check, please make out the $125 check to “Delta Caucus” and mail to:

Delta Caucus

5030 Purslane Place

Waldorf, MD 20601

GROUP HOTEL

The group hotel is the Doubletree, down the street from the Clinton Library. To get the discount rate of $99 for the night of May 28, call the hotel at 501-372-4371 or 1-800-222-8733 and say you are with the Delta Caucus group.

EXAMPLES OF PARTICIPANTS THUS FAR:

Continue reading...

20th Anniversary of White House Conference on the Delta Set for May 28-29, 2020 in Little Rock

Posted on December 09, 2019 at 01:03 PM

We are holding a very special if not unique event in the history of the Delta Grassroots Caucus on May 28-29, 2020: the commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the “Delta Vision, Delta Voices” White House Conference on the Delta in Washington, DC, during May of 2000.

It will be in Little Rock with the opening session currently set for the Arkansas Capitol Rotunda on May 28 and the main session at the Clinton Library on May 29. This is bipartisan.

We will have a series of funded announcements from foundations, corporations and nonprofits regarding community and economic development in the 8-state Greater Delta Region from southern Illinois and Missouri to New Orleans and eastward to the Alabama Black Belt. This will emphasize that along with our region’s ongoing economic challenges that we all know about it and work to change every day, there are also many constructive activities building toward a brighter future in the Delta.

We will re-dedicate ourselves to strong advocacy for the Greater Delta Region in 2020 and on into the future. The point of this conference is to generate action for the region’s economy by federal, state and local powers that be, and not just to have discussions and reminisce.

The opening session will be May 28 in the early evening from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Arkansas State Capitol Rotunda, followed by a socializing, informal dinner at the group hotel shortly afterward.

Then the main session will be at the Clinton Presidential Library Great Hall on from 8:15 p.m. to 2 p.m.

We will invite President Bill Clinton, Clinton administration officials who were involved in the Delta Regional Initiative, Gov. Asa Hutchinson, the Arkansas Congressional delegation, state legislators, mayors, nonprofits, business leaders, universities and colleges, and grassroots leaders from the 8-state region.

This is a very special event and space is limited. As Gene Sperling, one of President Clinton’s economic development advisers said recently at a recent great event at the Clinton Library on the 20th anniversary of Community Development Financial Institutions and other economic policies for lower income groups, when you are commemorating an initiative that has lasted 20 years it’s an indication of its merit that it was founded so long ago and is still going strong today.

KEY THEMES

The key themes will be women’s issues and economic opportunity in the Greater Delta Region. We believe that the Delta would benefit tremendously if we could unleash the economic potential by providing equal pay for equal work by women, greater opportunities for women in business and entrepreneurialism, nonprofits, the top executive positions in the academic world, elected office, and end gender discrimination in all its forms.

We will also devote substantial attention to economic initiatives for lower income and middle income working people, Community Development Financial Institutions, the Earned Income Tax Credit, programs similar to rural Empowerment Zones, job creation especially through small business and entrepreneurialism, health care, nutrition, and transportation, flood control, housing and infrastructure.

Greater participation by women will be helpful in all these categories. Of course all of the conference will not exclusively focus on women’s issues. In many cases the speakers on the economic opportunity issues will be women leaders.

We are delighted to have as Conference Co-Chair (along with Delta Caucus Director Lee Powell) the CEO, Rupa Dash, of the World Woman Federation, which recently held a great two-day conference at the Clinton Library with women leaders from across the USA and the world.

Rupa Dash has been a speaker previously to the Delta Caucus at the Clinton Library, and she has a strong interest in the Greater Delta Region. She has had a fascinating career and grew up in a region in India that was rural, impoverished, had major agricultural production, and was in a river delta region–it is very similar to the Mississippi Delta and she has a great affinity for our region.

Rupa Dash was very successful in the film industry in Los Angeles and is giving back through her great nonprofit work with the World Woman Federation and we are honored to have Ms. Dash and her organization partnering with us for this event.

REGISTRATION

This event will be on a large-scale and space is limited. If spaces become scarce we will have to do this on a first-come, first-first serve basis.

We will have a deadline by which the registration fees must be paid in order to gain admission. The deadline is May 18, 2020.

We will be full by that time. Registrations will not be accepted at the front desk at the time of the conference.

You register by paying the registration fees, which are $125.

For those who have paid their annual membership dues for the calendar year 2020 (we are beginning to accept annual membership dues for 2020 now), they will get reductions to $100 for the May event, the fall conference of the Delta Caucus, and other activities and communications by the Delta Caucus in 2020.

The fastest and easiest way to pay is to go on the website at mdgc.us and go to the PayPal link at the top of the site that says “Donate.” This automatically creates a written record of the transaction and it accepts all major debit and credit cards.

If you prefer to pay by check, please make out the check to “Delta Caucus” and mail to:

Delta Caucus

5030 Purslane Place

Waldorf, Maryland 20601

We are working on finalizing an agreement with the group hotel and will send along that information soon.

Thanks very much. Lee Powell, Executive Director, Delta Grassroots Caucus (202) 360-6347